I’m very excited to announce that CrossFit Winnipeg is the new home of the Dakota Weightlifting Club. We are grateful for the opportunity to partner up with such a great organization. We hope that this is the start of something great! Where CrossFit Winnipeg can provide a positive training environment for the Dakota Weightlifting Team, CrossFit Winnipeg members will benefit from Coach Terry Hadlow’s decades of experience as a trainer and Olympic Weightlifting coach.

Dakota Weightlifting Training Schedule

  • Monday to Friday mornings 9AM to 11AM
  • Monday and Thursday evenings 6PM to 8PM
  • Saturday and Sunday afternoons Noon to 2PM

Membership

If you want to train Olympic weightlifting the club offers a variety of membership options.

  • Unlimited Monthly Training $175 per month – includes coached sessions and open gym access.
  • 10 Session Pass $110 – includes access to coached training sessions.
  • Single Drop-In $20 – one coached session with the team

Click HERE to check out membership options or to purchase training sessions.

For more information on The Dakota Weightlifting Club, please visit their website at http://www.dakotaweightlifting.com/

About Head Coach Terry Hadlow

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1975-1984 Canadian National Weightlifting Team
1978 Commonwealth Games Champion – Edmonton
1979 Pan American Games Champion – Puerto Rico
1980-1984 Canadian Olympic Team Member
1980 Olympic Alternative Champion – China
1980 Pan American Champion – Cuba
1983 Graduate, University of Ottawa, Honors in Physical Education, specializing in Exercise Physiology
1985-1987 Manitoba Provincial Weightlifting Coach
1997-2000 Power & Conditioning Coach: Men’s National Volleyball
1999-Present Conditioning Coach: Optimal Training Academy
2000-2001 Conditioning Coach: Winnipeg Saints
2001-2004 Strength and Fitness Coach: Winnipeg South Blues
2006-present – Member of the Long Term Athlete Development Committee.  National Committee representing Weight-Lifting
2006, Pan-American Masters Weight Lifting Champion
2006, Canadian Master Weight Lifting Champion

 

Meet the rest of the Dakota Team 

About Olympic Weightlifting

The Snatch

In the snatch, the bar is pulled in one explosive motion from the floor to full arm’s length overhead. In order to make the lift easier to perform, athletes typically bend their legs quickly while the bar is rising in order to catch the bar at arm’s length. The combined attributes of great strength and blinding speed are needed to accomplish this challenging event effectively. The best lifters in the world (in the lighter weight classes can lift as much as 2.5 times their bodyweight in the Snatch). The best uerheavyweightweightlifters in history have lifted nearly 500 lb./227.5 kg. in this lift.*

Taken from The Weightlifting Encyclopdiea, by Artie Dreschler 

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Photo credit: hookgrip 

The Clean and Jerk

In the clean and jerk (C&J), the bar is also lifted to full arm’s length overhead. However, although it is considered one event, the C&J is really two lifts that must be completed one immediately after the other. In the clean, the bar is raised (pulled) in an explosive motion from the floor to a point of rest approximately at the level of the shoulders. (The rules permit lifting the bar within a zone from the chest above the nipples to a position above the shoulders, as long as the arms are in a fully bent position with the bar resting on the hands in the latter case).

The second part of the C&J, the jerk, consists of bending the legs and then extending both the arms and the legs to bring the bar to full arm’s length over the head in one explosive motion. In order to make the lift easier to perform, athletes typically drop into a “split” position, or merely bend their legs quickly while the bar is rising in order to catch the bar at arm’s length. Since the athlete is lifting the bar in two stages in the C&J, heavier weights can be lifted in the C&J than in the snatch.
The best lifters in the world in the lighter weight classes can lift as much as 3 times their bodyweight in the C&J. The best superheavyweight lifters in history have lifted nearly 600 lb./272.5 kg. in this lift. Often referred to as the “King (or Queen) of the lifts”, the C&J is the greatest single test of overall strength and power known.*

Taken from The Weightlifting Encyclopdiea, by Artie Dreschler 

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Photo credit: hookgrip